THE QUESTION

The Taliban is resurgent in Afghanistan. Rather than sending more troops, is it time to negotiate a truce there?

Posted by David Ignatius and Lauren Keane on June 23, 2008 11:05 AM

FROM THE PANEL

Shim Jae Hoon is a Seoul-based journalist and commentator writing for a variety of international publications including YaleGlobal Online, The Straits Times of Singapore, The Taipei Times and Korea Herald. He was a correspondent for Far Eastern Economic Review in Seoul, Taipei and Jakarta.

Fight Taliban, But Not With Weapons

How do you negotiate a truce with scattered bands of thuggish bandits fighting not for secular objectives but for religious fundamentalism?

Shim Jae Hoon South Korea | 15 COMMENTS
Jun 24, 2008 at 2:28 PM
Originally from Pakistan, Anwer Sher is based in Dubai and writes for Gulf News, Khaleej Times and Emirates Today. His varied career experience includes banking, consulting, and real estate development. He has a Masters degree in International Relations.

Truce Could Bring Greater Taliban Power

Anwer Sher Dubai, UAE | 2 COMMENTS
Dr. Ali Ettefagh serves as a director of Highmore Global Corporation, an investment company in emerging markets of Eastern Europe, CIS, and the Middle East. He is the co-author of several books on trade conflict, resolution of international trade disputes, conflicts in letters of credit, trade-related banking transactions, sovereign debt, arbitration and dispute resolutions and publications specific to the oil and gas, communication, aviation and finance sectors. Dr. Ettefagh is a member of the executive committee and the board of directors of The Development Foundation, an advisor to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, and an advisor to a number of European companies. Dr. Ettefagh speaks Persian (Farsi), English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Arabic and Turkish.

Understanding a Changing Taliban Front

Ali Ettefagh Tehran, Iran | 14 COMMENTS
Miklós Vámos is a Hungarian novelist, screenwriter and talk show host. He is one of the most read and respected writers in his native Hungary. He has taught at Yale University on a Fulbright fellowship, served as The Nation’s East European correspondent, worked as consultant on the Oscar-winning film Mephisto, and presented Hungary’s most-watched cultural television show. Vámos has received numerous awards for his plays, screenplays, novels and short stories, including the Hungarian Merit Award for lifetime achievement. The Book of Fathers is considered his most accomplished novel and has sold 200,000 copies in Hungary.

Taliban Truce Discussion Too Late

Miklos Vamos Budapest, Hungary | 2 COMMENTS
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