Daoud Kuttab at PostGlobal

Daoud Kuttab

Jerusalem/Amman, Jordan

Daoud Kuttab is a Palestinian journalist. He was born in Jerusalem in 1955. He is a former Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University in the United States. Mr. Kuttab is the former director of the Institute of Modern Media at Al Quds University in Ramallah, Palestine and the founder of AmmanNet, the Arab world's first internet radio station. His personal web page is www.daoudkuttab.com. Close.

Daoud Kuttab

Jerusalem/Amman, Jordan

Daoud Kuttab is a Palestinian journalist. He was born in Jerusalem in 1955. He is a former Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University in the United States. more »

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February 2008 Archives



February 11, 2008 3:38 PM

Lifting Ban Wins Turkish Hearts and Minds

I like that secularists in Turkey are keeping their country secular. God knows we have suffered and will probably suffer from governments, leaders and religious people trying to insert God directly into politics instead of just considering religion as a source of shared values. During my teaching here at Princeton, and during some of my travels in the U.S., I have found that people have some doubts about the principle of separation of church and state (it applies to all religions.) Indeed, they were surprised when I told them that this is one area in which many true democrats look favorably at the U.S. and the west.

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February 19, 2008 2:21 PM

Cuba Still Hostage To Its Exiles

The Current Discussion: With Castro gone, will Cuba become America's 51st state?

It is a shame that Cuban-U.S. relations have taken such a partisan direction, but the future of Cuban-American relations are certainly going to be better than the past. We are sure of one thing this year: whoever wins the White House will certainly not be a radically anti-Cuba conservative. While U.S. policy against Cuba might have had some logic to it years back, there is no logic to it now.

While change is certain to take place in 2009 due to the new president and the absence of Castro, it is unlikely that that change will be major. Cubans will not change their policies quickly and neither will the American establishment. A lot of what will happen after the inauguration in 2009 will depend on the attitudes of the small group of radical American-Cuban Republicans who have been holding Washington hostage to their extremely radical anti-Castro policies.
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